Compare and Contrast – EP

A folkish EP / mini album of organ-based, minimalist pop songs, with unassuming vocals and authentically retro style. These modest jams utilize a couple of vintage Bontempi organs from the 70s and 80s as well as a 1975 Cordovox combo organ. There is some 3/4 acoustic guitar in the title track, and some space theremin is peppered in here and there.

Available on Apple Music

It’s Not Just a Job, It’s An Adventure

Army Navy, one the finest bands to come out of Los Angeles in probably the last 10 years, has put out a new video, directed by veteran young writer/director Mark Schoenecker and featuring Martin Starr(Freaks and Geeks.) The well respected group has enjoyed steadily increasing popularity since they burst onto the scene several years ago. Their latest video, for the song titled “World’s End,” is a refreshingly unassuming masterpiece. In this era of illiterate Ke$ha softcore, and perplexingly popular yet total cheeseball songs like “I Wanna Be A Billionaire,” director Schoenecker refreshingly manages to capture the golden age of Sunset Strip innocence and combine it with 21st century, contemporary appeal. Stylistically, “World’s End” is seemingly modeled after the old music variety shows like Shindig, which once dominated television airwaves and introduced many famous musical acts. Yet, this is not really a “retro” video. Rather it represents a return to lost fundamental standards of taste, and attention to long abandoned qualities like color usage, ambiance, and subtlety. In other words, it is the future we now live in, the way we’ve always hoped it would be.

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Music Video Shot on Polaroid Spectra Film

A while back I shot a music video for my song “Apricots and Afterthoughts”(directed by Steven Christopher Wallace and starring Ashleigh Taylor-Silverman.) I posted it here previously without any explanation.

This video was shot entirely on actual Polaroid Spectra film (not the new Fuji Instamax or the “Impossible Project” replica type.) Given that they no longer make this stuff, it had to be purchased off of eBay at great cost (about $40 per pack of 10!) Because the film was expired and came from a wide variety of individual sellers, a good portion of the film was simply unusable. Many full packs of film had to be discarded. I found out the hard way that 2004-2005 seems to be the cutoff expiration date in terms of whether Polaroid film will still function or not.

We ended up with maybe 17-20 cartridges which were mostly good, and we were fortunate enough to have a great model. She photographed so well that we were able to use 95% of the pictures taken of her, which made us able to complete the video without having to resort to using additional fillers or patchwork.
It was shot completely in my living room. I have some actual HD video footage of the shooting which I will edit and post at a later date.